Nearly Knotweed   4 comments

 

Japanese knotweed, Polygonum cuspidatum, a member of the Polygonaceae family,  has hollow stems with distinct raised nodes.  It’s easy to find new growth, just look for last years old dead remains (which still stand, up to 12 or 13 feet high); and look down!  You will see chunky green stems, flecked with red, topped in red, with tiny red and green leaf buds.

 

The spade shaped leaves are broad, ovalish, pointed on the ends, with a truncated base.

 

Japanese Knotweed is a wonderful source of vitamins A and C, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, resveratrol, and zinc.

 

If you don’t have Japanese Knotweed near you, come visit!  We can harvest loads and loads of Knotweed, here!

 

 To get in a saucy Knotweed mood, click:

 https://forageporage.wordpress.com/2011/05/08/how-do-you-quell-an-invasion-you-eat-it/

 Or, take a look at Marie Viljoen’s creative cooking:

http://66squarefeetfood.blogspot.com/2012/03/knotweed-and-lamb-curry.html

 Or, try  Blanche Cybele Derby’s Dandy-Knot muffin recipe; found in her DVD “Edible plants: Wild + Tame” (Spring):

Blanche Cybele Derby:   http://www.tagyerit.com/freefood.htm

 Or, click a link, below, for some of  Wildman Steve Brill’s fabulous Knotweed Recipes,

Apple and Knotweed Pie
Knot Ice Cream
Knot Soup
Knotweed Sherbet
Steamed Knotweed Sesame
Strawberry-Knotweed Cobbler

 

For more fun with Japanese Knotweed:

https://forageporage.wordpress.com/2011/10/06/welcome-to-the-knotweed-forest/

https://forageporage.wordpress.com/2011/10/15/wild-discoveries-in-the-knotweed-forest/

http://www.knottybits.com/knotweed/FajaFieldPhotos.htm

 

Caution should be taken when eating Japanese Knotweed, as it contains oxalic acid, which can aggravate conditions such as arthritis, gout, hyperacidity, kidney stones and rheumatism.

 

Thanx for stopping by.  See you next time!

 

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4 responses to “Nearly Knotweed

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  1. I’ve got a knotweed page in the Plants section of my site http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com, along with recipes. I cover it in my books, with lots of recipes in my Wild Vegan Cookbook, with more info and recipes in my app, WildEdibles.

  2. We have more recipes up on our blog, The 3 Foragers. Love to eat those invasive species. Karen
    http://the3foragers.blogspot.com/2012/04/japanese-knotweed-recipe-knotweed.html

  3. Pingback: Springing Into Summer, Along the Wareham River. « Forageporage's Blog

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